Manchester Terrorist Attack May 2017

If you are worried about anyone who might be missing, you can call the dedicated helpline on 0800 096 0095 and here is the link to a dedicated website https://www.gov.uk/guidance/manchester-attack-may-2017-support-for-people-affected.

Please find below a communication from the Director of Police, Crime, Criminal Justice and Fire

Dear Colleagues,

Please help us support those affected by last night’s terror attack in Greater Manchester by sharing and signposting the following information through your networks. This information is also available on this webpage: www.gmvictims.org.uk/manchester-terror-attack

If you have been affected by last night’s terror attack at Manchester Arena, help and support is available.

Victim Support is a national charity providing immediate emotional and practical local support to victims and witnesses of the Manchester attack. They can also refer people onto specialist services if needed.

Contact Victim Support’s national support line on 0808 168 9111 or, if you live in Greater Manchester, call 0161 200 1950.

If you’re looking for a loved one who is still missing following the attack, please call this emergency number: 0800 096 0095.

Transport for Greater Manchester is providing updates regarding road closures and temporary transport diversions and delays. You can find out more on the TfGM website and from @OfficialTfGM on Twitter.

Greater Manchester Police is appealing for any images or footage from last night that you believe can assist them. Please upload these to ukpoliceimageappeal.co.uk or ukpoliceimageappeal.com.

Thank you to everyone who has sent messages of support; the community spirit in our city region has shone through at this very sad time.

If sharing information, please be sure to only share trusted sources and follow @gmpolice on Twitter and Facebook for updates and information.

For more information and updates:

If you require further information please contact: gaynor.edwards@gmpcc.org.uk

Kind regards,

Adam Allen

Director, Police, Crime, Criminal Justice and Fire

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Mental wellbeing advice from the NHS, following the Manchester Arena Incident

This guidance is aimed at anyone exposed to the incident at Manchester Arena that took place on 22 May 2017. The emotional effects will be felt by survivors, bereaved families, friends, emergency services, health care workers and the general public. If you witnessed or lost someone in the attack you will most certainly have a strong reaction. Reactions are likely to be strongest in those closest to the incident, who directly witnessed the aftermath and who were involved in the immediate care of victims.

Common reactions to traumatic events

 The following responses are normal and to be expected in the first few weeks:

  • Emotional reactions such as feeling afraid, sad, horrified, helpless, overwhelmed, angry, confused, numb or disorientated
  • Distressing thoughts and images that just pop into your head
  • Nightmares
  • Disturbed sleep or insomnia
  • Feeling anxious
  • Low mood

These responses are a normal part of recovery and are the mind’s mechanisms of trying to make sense and come to terms with what happened. They should subside over time.

What can people do to cope?

 The most helpful way of coping with an event like this is to be with people you feel close to and normally spend time with.

  • If it helps, talk to someone you feel comfortable with (friends, family, co-workers) about how you are feeling.
  • Talk at your own pace and as much as you feel it’s useful.
  • Be willing to listen to others who may need to talk about how they feel.
  • Take time to grieve and cry if you need to. Letting feelings out is helpful in the long run.
  • Ask for emotional and practical support from friends, family members, your community or religious centre.
  • Try to return to everyday routines and habits. They can be comforting and help you feel less out of sorts. Look after yourself: eat and sleep well, exercise and relax.
  • Try to spend some time doing something that feels good and that you enjoy.
  • Be understanding about yourself.

  How can children be helped to cope?

  • Let them know that you understand their feelings.
  • Give them the opportunity to talk, if and when they want to.
  • Respect their pace.
  • Reassure them that they are safe.
  • Keep to usual routines.
  • Keep them from seeing too much of the frightening pictures of the event.

 When should a person seek more help?

 In the early stages, psychological professional help is not usually necessary or recommended. Many people recover naturally from these events. However, some people may need additional support to help them cope. For example, young children, people who have had other traumatic events happen to them and people with previous mental health difficulties may be more vulnerable.

If about a month after the event anyone is still experiencing the following difficulties, it is a good idea to seek help:

  • Feeling upset and fearful most of the time
  • Acting very differently to before the trauma
  • Not being able to work or look after the home and family
  • Having deteriorating relationship difficulties
  • Using drugs or drinking too much
  • Feeling very jumpy
  • Still not being able to stop thinking about the incidents
  • Still not being able to enjoy life at all

You can access help by:

 Speaking to your local GP

 

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